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gulfstream69xr7

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  1. This a great forum. I did a search on how to refinish the brushed part of a stainless band, and how to polish a mirror finish on the bezel on my TAG. Read though a bunch of posts from the forum members. Turns out I had almost everything in my workshop I needed. Had my wife pick up a scotch brite pad at the grocery store. I already had Mothers Aluminum Mag Polish, a buffing wheel, and several different grades of jewelers rouge. The TAG is my everday, cut the grass, ride my bike, wear while working around the property watch. Over the years the stainless band, and the polished bezel got really beat up. Started with the scotch brite pad. Carefully ran it along the band in one direction until all of the major scratches were blended in. I did not want to be too aggresive, so I it used very little pressure, and it took about twenty minutes. Put some of the Mothers Mag Polish on a clean rag and again, gently ran it in one direction until I had the finish I was looking for. I could have done less, if I wanted a more heavily brushed finish, or I could have kept polishing if I had wanted a more polished finish. I think I got it back to as close to original as possible. Then I turned on my buffing wheel with a clean soft pad attached. Ran the jewelers rouge against the pad until the pad was the color of the rouge. Started with a red rouge. Got a pretty good polish on the bezel with that. Switched to another clean pad and did the same thing with a white rouge. The bezel finish is near mirror. Cleaned the whole watch with soap and water. It looks awesome. Thanks to everyone who made these great suggestions.
  2. Just checked your website. Great info there. I will get things together and contact you. Probably some time next week. Thank you very much!
  3. I am wondering if any of you watch enthusiasts can help me out. Many years ago my father gave me an antique Elgin pocket watch. My parents divorced shortly after that, and I had little contact with my father beyond the divorce. He has long since passed away. I though that I had lost the watch not long after he had given it to me. Imagine my surprise when I was going through some old things in my attic that had been boxed up for years when I came across the pocket watch that my father gave me over thirty years ago. (not to mention a bunch of other really neat things from my childhood) Using the names and serial numbers on the watch and case I was able to find that the mechanism was made in the 1890's and the case we early 20th century. The watch is an Elgin Watch Company pocket watch. It is currently not working, and is missing the crown. The watch is not particularly valuable, but it has obvious sentimental value to me. I'd like to be able to get it repaired. Someday I'd like to pass it on to my son. It is the only item that I have that connects me to my father. Do any of you know of someone who specializes in repairing antique pocket watches? Thanks, Paul Garvin
  4. This a great forum. I did a search on how to refinish the brushed part of a stainless band, and how to polish a mirror finish on the bezel on my TAG. Read though a bunch of posts from the forum members. Turns out I had almost everything in my workshop I needed. Had my wife pick up a scotch brite pad at the grocery store. I already had Mothers Aluminum Mag Polish, a buffing wheel, and several different grades of jewelers rouge. The TAG is my everday, cut the grass, ride my bike, wear while working around the property watch. Over the years the stainless band, and the polished bezel got really beat up. Started with the scotch brite pad. Carefully ran it along the band in one direction until all of the major scratches were blended in. I did not want to be too aggresive, so I it used very little pressure, and it took about twenty minutes. Put some of the Mothers Mag Polish on a clean rag and again, gently ran it in one direction until I had the finish I was looking for. I could have done less, if I wanted a more heavily brushed finish, or I could have kept polishing if I had wanted a more polished finish. I think I got it back to as close to original as possible. Then I turned on my buffing wheel with a clean soft pad attached. Ran the jewelers rouge against the pad until the pad was the color of the rouge. Started with a red rouge. Got a pretty good polish on the bezel with that. Switched to another clean pad and did the same thing with a white rouge. The bezel finish is near mirror. Cleaned the whole watch with soap and water. It looks awesome. Thanks to everyone who made these great suggestions.
  5. Just checked your website. Great info there. I will get things together and contact you. Probably some time next week. Thank you very much!
  6. I am wondering if any of you watch enthusiasts can help me out. Many years ago my father gave me an antique Elgin pocket watch. My parents divorced shortly after that, and I had little contact with my father beyond the divorce. He has long since passed away. I though that I had lost the watch not long after he had given it to me. Imagine my surprise when I was going through some old things in my attic that had been boxed up for years when I came across the pocket watch that my father gave me over thirty years ago. (not to mention a bunch of other really neat things from my childhood) Using the names and serial numbers on the watch and case I was able to find that the mechanism was made in the 1890's and the case we early 20th century. The watch is an Elgin Watch Company pocket watch. It is currently not working, and is missing the crown. The watch is not particularly valuable, but it has obvious sentimental value to me. I'd like to be able to get it repaired. Someday I'd like to pass it on to my son. It is the only item that I have that connects me to my father. Do any of you know of someone who specializes in repairing antique pocket watches? Thanks, Paul Garvin
  7. This a great forum. I did a search on how to refinish the brushed part of a stainless band, and how to polish a mirror finish on the bezel on my TAG. Read though a bunch of posts from the forum members. Turns out I had almost everything in my workshop I needed. Had my wife pick up a scotch brite pad at the grocery store. I already had Mothers Aluminum Mag Polish, a buffing wheel, and several different grades of jewelers rouge. The TAG is my everday, cut the grass, ride my bike, wear while working around the property watch. Over the years the stainless band, and the polished bezel got really beat up. Started with the scotch brite pad. Carefully ran it along the band in one direction until all of the major scratches were blended in. I did not want to be too aggresive, so I it used very little pressure, and it took about twenty minutes. Put some of the Mothers Mag Polish on a clean rag and again, gently ran it in one direction until I had the finish I was looking for. I could have done less, if I wanted a more heavily brushed finish, or I could have kept polishing if I had wanted a more polished finish. I think I got it back to as close to original as possible. Then I turned on my buffing wheel with a clean soft pad attached. Ran the jewelers rouge against the pad until the pad was the color of the rouge. Started with a red rouge. Got a pretty good polish on the bezel with that. Switched to another clean pad and did the same thing with a white rouge. The bezel finish is near mirror. Cleaned the whole watch with soap and water. It looks awesome. Thanks to everyone who made these great suggestions.
  8. Just checked your website. Great info there. I will get things together and contact you. Probably some time next week. Thank you very much!
  9. I am wondering if any of you watch enthusiasts can help me out. Many years ago my father gave me an antique Elgin pocket watch. My parents divorced shortly after that, and I had little contact with my father beyond the divorce. He has long since passed away. I though that I had lost the watch not long after he had given it to me. Imagine my surprise when I was going through some old things in my attic that had been boxed up for years when I came across the pocket watch that my father gave me over thirty years ago. (not to mention a bunch of other really neat things from my childhood) Using the names and serial numbers on the watch and case I was able to find that the mechanism was made in the 1890's and the case we early 20th century. The watch is an Elgin Watch Company pocket watch. It is currently not working, and is missing the crown. The watch is not particularly valuable, but it has obvious sentimental value to me. I'd like to be able to get it repaired. Someday I'd like to pass it on to my son. It is the only item that I have that connects me to my father. Do any of you know of someone who specializes in repairing antique pocket watches? Thanks, Paul Garvin
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