Jump to content

shirerry362

Members
  • Content Count

    1,411
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About shirerry362

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Not Telling
  1. I have a 16610 with a 93150 bracelet and 501B end links, due to my stupidity I squished one of the end links and having a hell of a time trying to get it to fit snuggly. Does anyone have any experience with fixing bent end links? Also does anyone know the cost of a genuine 501B from RSC? Also does anyone know if the aftermarket end links on eBay they claim to fit original spring bars fit well against the case? They are under $50 for the pair so I guess I don't lose much by trying but figured I should ask just in case someone has experience with them. I've used pliers and have bent them close to the original shape: And here us the end link that I did not screw up fitting nice and snuggly:
  2. Now that few months have passed, I feel like my next purchase (or the one after that) will most definitely be a Rolex. I need a watch that is durable, and is suited for casual dressing + everyday lives. Rolex definitely fits in this category as well as Panerai and some others. I personally don't like popular watches for some reason - they don't feel unique enough, and I want something different on my wrist. This does not mean I enjoy watches that are like REALLY minor and stuff; it's just that I find watches that do not get its photos uploaded on the forums often more interesting. Rolex are popular for many reasons BUT for the right ones. Porsche, BMW and Mercedes motor cars are also popular vehicles in the same way as Rolex wrist watches. Rolex are unique as they use 904L highest quality stainless steel available whereby most others use 316L. They are one of the few watch houses with their own in-house movements in every model; tried and tested for over 50 years; modified slightly over that time period! They retain their value the most as well as Patek Philippe with minimum depreciation. The Rolex Oyster, Submariner/Sea-Dwellers, GMTs are as revolutionary to horology as a Porsche 911 is to motor vehicle manufacturing. The performance and durability being superb. Well, I guess as long as it is a Rolex it will inevitably be something that lots of people wear (considering their humongous production volumes), but to start off I eliminated - Submariner(too common), - for good reason that goes back to The Late 50s! You cannot go wrong with one on your wrist even though not my first choice. - Yacht Master (a no no design) Subtle watch and very classy looking for what it is; modest and an understatement by comparison! - Daytona (I'm going for a Everose Gold Daytona in the future, so I need a durable SS one for now), - Excellent classic COSC Chronometer Chronograph albeit not for me. - Sky Dweller (again a no no design), This is a unique watch I have not seen with other model of rolex like the Yatchmaster II - GMT Master (I don't need GMT complication, nor the design is speaking to me) It is not complicated, it is rather simple and the new ones allow the wearer by pulling the crown to one stop to just change the hour hand backwards or forwards as he or she travels through timezones! The seconds and minute hand remain where they were unhacked! - Cellini (I love Cellini lines the most from Rolex, but I don't need more dress watches for now, so will consider buying one much later) and finally Rolex dress watch and different from the main models - Deep Sea (too thick) from my list. for good reason as it is a 3900 meter/12,800 feet water resistant watch; unrivalled for engineering. The standard Sea Dweller 1,220 meter/4,000 feet is a Submariner to a greater depth And Datejust, I dunno... it's not bad but I moved it to the bottom of my list for now because they are flagship models and are also very common Benchmark iconic model that put Rolex to where they are today. What this model did for Rolex is compared with the 3 series model for BMW! I'm currently trying to decide between three models: Milgauss white dial consider the Black dial with some orange markings on the dial with green tint crystal GV model amazing Explorer I 214270 Also consider the new 42mm Explorer II Polar or the classic black dial and Sea Dweller 4000 Super watch and cannot go wrong. It is 40mm and I chose the Sea-Dweller that is about 43mm better for my 8.25 inch wrist Continue to do your homework and research as I sense you will find the right model for you. When you "pull the trigger" to get one with all the boxes, cards, tags etc. - you will wonder why you did not buy one some time ago! Rolex is not my favorite or even the best Swiss watchhouse watch in my collection as I just have the DSSD and Yatchmaster platinum dial and bezel left in my collection BUT they are simply brilliant and can never ever not having one. Viva Rolex !
  3. Back to the 14060. Shouldn't have parted with it in the first place.
  4. and you didn't think to ask the RSC rep or AD rep or watchmaker who told you this?? Are Rolexs Really This Fragile (GMT Master)/ Is A Warranty Worth The paper Its Written On?
  5. What else is in your collection?
  6. Sounds like you've been lucky. My BP will run at about +7 when fully wound and worn daily. In the 4 or 5 day range of the power reserve everything goes to hell and I start getting +20s or worse. In days 1 and 2 things slow back down and the watch stays a few minutes ahead but at a consistent rate, before finally stopping. This is after a full servicing from an IWC trained service center at my local AD. When placed on a measurement device, the watch shows less than 5 seconds deviation in all positions, but in real life the performance isn't great. Like everyone has said, the 7 day power reserve on a single barrel makes it difficult to achieve great accuracy. Then again, a 46 mm case full of iron also makes it heavy to wear. As with people, some watch relationships are more complicated. The BP and 5000 calibers have a sort of love/hate things going for them.
  7. shirerry362

    First IWC

    Nice, congrats
  8. Hi everyone! Here is my issue. I own a vintage IWC watch with caliber 8541 (automatic - serial #174xxxx) and I have problems with self winding. In fact, if I start wearing the watch after a period of complete inactivity (i.e. the watch is not running) the movements of my arm apparently do not provide it with enough energy to keep running. The watch usually stops after a few minutes, or anyway until I start moving the arm again. Instead if I wind it manually the watch has a long power reserve of several days.. I brought the watch to service (good reputation watch atelier) and, after the intervention, the guy told me that he did the maximum (i.e. full revision) but also that these kinds of old movements often have self winding issues.. Did any of you had similar experiences with this caliber or vintage watches in general? Do you agree with the service guy? Do you have any suggestion of the possible causes of this issue? Or do I simply have to accept that these kind of watches are like this..? Many thanks in advance for your help!
  9. I had this happen on my strap on my 5001-07 about 2 months after I got it. I emailed IWC about it and was in contact with their concierge and asked if this was normal. They initially wanted me to send my strap in for examination to see if it was faulty. After a few emails back and forth, I sent them pictures of the strap along with my warranty card and serial number and they agreed to send me a new one. I still wore the strap with the rubber edging off since it still works just fine and just kept the one IWC sent me as a spare.
×
×
  • Create New...